The ESRC, 50 Years On

Walker, D. (2015) Exaggerated Claims? The ESRC, 50 Years On

This book looks at the role of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and its relationship with academics, non-university researchers, policy-makers and government.

David Walker, a journalist and former head of policy at the Academy of Social Sciences, argues that the ESRC’s founders were inspired by a vision where policy and practice-relevant social science research would be produced by both university and non-university research centres. In contrast, what materialised, so Walker contends, is a council which often funds knowledge which is “antinomian, autistic and disconnected” from the other parts of the “state apparatus” which conduct research.

Walker does recognise that Michael Young and Andrew Shonfield – the first two chairs of the ESRC – were keen advocates of “social science as policy science”. He also convincingly argues that consumers of research do not necessarily give priority to academic work but rather make use of all information that is materially relevant to their field of interest. The implication of this view is that the focus of research projects should be less influenced by what researchers themselves find interesting and more influenced by a genuine, multidirectional partnership between the various constituencies who are interested in research.

This erudite, eminently quotable and thoroughly iconoclastic book tells the story of opportunities lost; it is not an account of unequivocal failure. It is also about much more than the ESRC, as Walker has issued a clarion call to all those who believe in interdisciplinary working.

Review originally published in Reviews. Significance, 13:4 45, doi: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2016.00943.x

A Theory of Change

Why not take a look at Matthew Taylor’s lecture entitled Why policy fails – and how it might succeed?

During an interesting lecture, Taylor, Chief Executive of the RSA, outlines his theory of change with reference to the Scottish Constitutional Convention, the ban on smoking in public places and the minimum/living wage.

He also refers to the RSA’s work on developing a model of Basic Income.

The lecture is available here.

The RSA report – Creative Citizen, creative state: the principled and pragmatic case for a Universal Basic Income  can be downloaded here.